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Artist Feature

Every week an artist is featured whose single image was published by Der Greif. The Feature shows the image in the original context of the series.

Adam Sajkowski - Untitled

Jun 19, 2019

These pictures are part of an on-going interest of looking for and re-creating flatness in photographic images – Finding the limits of what constitutes a photograph, as well as what makes a good picture.

 

The work generally falls into the genre of re-photography – using a mix of medium-format and digital image-making – referencing certain institutional genres of photography (archival/commercial) as well as photographic ephemera and presentation devices.

 

More recently, the process of making these pictures does not involve a camera to capture the photographic moment. Instead, found digital imagery and 3D-elements are combined within a virtual studio allowing random variables to define the output – the rendering of the digital images akin to the photos developing in a darkroom.

 


Artist Blog

The blog of Der Greif is written entirely by the artists who have been invited to doing an Artist-Feature. Every week, we have a different author.

Re-photography

Jun 25, 2019 - Adam Sajkowski

I am interested in what is a picture. Re-photography, as a tool, is one of the simplest ways to create a dialogue about this idea.

 

It is a dynamic layering of information. Initially appearing as a straight photograph, within this new context it becomes flat. When registered as a photograph taken in a studio, it can again appear three-dimensional.

 

The photograph here represents not only an image but an object.


Satisfaction/Refraction

Jun 24, 2019 - Adam Sajkowski

Here, the decisive moment is not when the photograph is taken but when the photograph is viewed. Primarily in the studio and more recently entirely within the computer – the process of making these pictures combines found imagery and digital three-dimensional elements within a constructed virtual studio. The resulting images provoke a visceral reaction to our innate understanding of photographs and how they register in our heads.

 

The satisfaction/refraction of glass and light, creating tension through the presentation of impossible objects, alongside common, found images – It plays with the boundary between reality and fiction.